• Bullying is a serious issue in schools. We remind about the relevant legislation and definitions in the first of three articles about dealing with school bullies. Read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Bullying is a serious issue in schools. We remind about the relevant legislation and definitions in the first of three articles about dealing with school bullies. Read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

  • The SAPS is adamant that they want to deal with police members who lead double lives and are susceptible to corrupt activities. All SAPS employees should read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus about what it being done to root out corruption.

    The SAPS is adamant that they want to deal with police members who lead double lives and are susceptible to corrupt activities. All SAPS employees should read this article in the December 2017 issue of Servamus about what it being done to root out corruption.

  • Are you a sucker for #FakeNews? We share valuable tips how to distinguish between the good, the bad and the ugly in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

    Are you a sucker for #FakeNews? We share valuable tips how to distinguish between the good, the bad and the ugly in the December 2017 issue of Servamus.

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Article and photos by Annalise Kempen

Police members who are passionate about making a difference warm my heart. At the 18th Tracker SAPS annual awards ceremony that was held on 6 October 2017 in Pretoria, I had the opportunity to meet a few of these members. These are some of the many police members who are willing to go a few extra miles, often while having to do their job with minimal resources. Fortunately, there is one type of resource that many of these members have access to, namely Tracker technology which assists them in vehicle tracking, recoveries and subsequent arrests.

Celebrating a milestone
Twenty-one years ago, the formal relationship between the South African Police Service and Tracker started after the two parties had signed an agreement in April 1996. It entailed that Tracker would supply vehicle tracking and recovery systems. This agreement was made after the SAPS had entered into negotiations with Tracker and Unicode to obtain technology to support the police in fighting vehicle-related crime. At the time, Servamus reported that the two systems would complement each other in that the tracking system would enable the police to successfully track and recover stolen vehicles, while Unicode would provide irrefutable identification of the vehicle when it was recovered and ensure retrieval by its rightful owner. On 1 October 1996, the official switch-on of the Tracker stolen vehicle tracking and recovery system took place (Huisamen, 1996).

In those years, having a tracking device installed in your vehicle was not as common as it is today. Nevertheless, two large vehicle manufacturers endorsed the Tracker system. Their reasons included that the system had a direct link to the police and operated nationally. These days, it is far more common to have a tracking system installed in one's vehicle and it has even become a prerequisite by many short-term insurers for specific vehicle models with a higher risk of being stolen or hijacked. Yet, Tracker is still the only vehicle tracking company in South Africa to have a formal agreement with the SAPS.

The results speak for themselves after 21 years
Thanks to the Tracker/SAPS partnership, which has lasted for the past 21 years, more than 84 000 stolen and hijacked vehicles have been recovered, which amounts to a monetary value of almost R13 billion in today's terms. In addition, almost 16 500 suspects have been arrested at an arrest rate of one arrest for every five vehicles recovered. This has been made possible thanks to the thousands of police members who have been trained in using the Tracker technology that has been fitted in almost 1500 police vehicles and aircraft. However, having technology means nothing if people, and in this case police members, do not use this technology to aid them in fighting crime.

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[This is only an extract of an article published from p 46 in Servamus: November 2017. The rest of this article gives recognition to the different provincial and national winners on both a unit and individual level. Contact Servamus’s offices to request the rest of this article by sending an e-mail to: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or by phoning (012) 345 4660/22.]

Servamus - December 2017

A Free State farmer responded to an OLX advert from someone selling animal feed. "I wanted to buy cattle feed, so I deposited the R21 000 immediately after I verified the seller's banking details," he said.
By Kotie Geldenhuys
During mid-October 2017, social media was awash with the news that approximately 30 million South Africans' personal information had been hacked.
By Annalise Kempen
There is no positive light in which to paint the latest crime statistics released by the Minister of Police, Fikile Mbalula, on 24 October 2017.
By Annalise Kempen
Ben is a 14-year-old teenage boy who comes across the online game the Blue Whale. While playing this game, he has to complete one challenge after another.
By Kotie Geldenhuys

Pollex - December 2017

Years ago, when General Motors “was still a sergeant”, the police’s motto was “Servamus et Servimus”, meaning “we protect and we serve”.
Read More - S V Phillips 2017 (1) SACR 373 (SCA)
Background Section 4(1) of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act 12 of 2004 (hereinafter referred to as Act 12 of 2004) provides as follows:
Read More - S V Setlholo 2017 (1) SACR 544 (NCK)
In this case the accused was, at the time of committing the two offences concerned, a constable in the SAPS.

Letters - December 2017

While participating in the SAPS National Half-marathon held in Rustenburg during October 2017, I decided that I wanted to run all the marathon races in the Bay during 2018.
On Wednesday 1 November 2017, at approximately 10:00, Capt B R Simpson and Const T E Ntuli from the FLASH Unit at SAPS Emanguzi were travelling along the R22 main road (Engozeni area) towards the Farazela Port of Entry at the Mozambican border.
South African communities are faced with various crimes and it has been a challenge to every citizen to play a role in bringing all perpetrators to justice by working hand-in-hand with the South African Police Service.
Members of the social crime prevention office of Emanguzi SAPS have been working hard to bring awareness to the local communities in an effort to protect the most vulnerable and youngest members in our communities.
December 2017 Magazine Cover

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Servamus is a community-based safety and security magazine for both members of the community as well as safety and security practitioners with the aim of increasing knowledge and sharing information, dedicated to improving their expertise, professionalism and service delivery standards. It promotes sound crime management practices, freedom of speech, education, training, information sharing and a networking platform.